About

Sleep Problems and Adolescent Drug Use

Mechanisms Underlying the Relationship between Sleep Problems and Drug Use in Adolescence

Duration: 2013 - Present
Funding: NIH/NIDA
Principal Investigator: Diana Fishbein
Partners: University of California at Irvine, RTI, Brown University

Description

This prospective, longitudinal study is designed to elucidate mechanisms underlying the relationship between sleep ‎problems and propensity to drug/alcohol use in adolescents, from age 10 through 20. Our integrative, temporal model theorizes that ‎sleep problems will be significant predictors of drug/alcohol initiation and escalation of use in adolescents. ‎

We propose further that this relationship can be explained at least in part by emotion dysregulation, as ‎measured by tasks that recruit affective limbic structures and perturbations in neuroendocrine (cortisol) ‎functioning. Level of cognitive functioning will moderate the relationship between sleep problems and drug ‎use. Exposure to prolonged stress is expected to amplify the mediational relationship.

Finally, the model ‎predicts that eventual drug use will exacerbate sleep problems and lead to further decrements in sleep, ‎emotion regulation, and cognition, promoting an escalating pattern of use

Research Team

Publications

Neurocognitive characteristics of early marijuana use initiation in adolescents: A signature mapping analysis

Fishbein, D., Novak, S. P., Ridenour, T. A., Thornburg, V., Hammond, J. C., & Brown, J. (2016). Neurocognitive characteristics of early marijuana use initiation in adolescents: A signature mapping analysis. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 77(3), 431-440. doi: 19371888