About

Cross-Cohort Research Programme: Employment, Health, and Well-Being

Duration: 2016 - Present
Funding: University College, London
Principal Investigator: Jennifer Maggs
Partners: Centre for Longitudinal Studies

Description

Alcohol is a key risk factor for chronic disease and injury globally, with a higher proportion of alcohol-attributable deaths and disease burden in Europe than any other region of the world. In this project, we are examining links between alcohol use and health, addressing key questions relevant to alcohol and health policy from adolescence through midlife. Benefits of light to moderate drinking receive considerable media attention and are sometimes acknowledged in physician and government health advice.

Two connected streams of research will extend our prior National Institutes of Health-funded work on predictors and consequences of alcohol use in the British cohort studies and facilitate closer collaboration with Centre for Longitudinal Studies investigators at the University College London. Using over five decades of data covering childhood through midlife, our U.S.-based team will assess short- and long-term impacts of alcohol use on health-risk behaviors, mental health, and physical health.

Data will be used to determine whether levels of alcohol use in midlife boost or compromise health up to age 55 (e.g., chronic conditions, BMI, depression, overall health), even after matching on observed characteristics such as prior health, work history, educational attainment, social support, and health-risk behaviors. 

Publications

Links with health and well-being in the long-term National Child Development Study.

Staff, J., & Maggs, J. L. (2017). Alcohol and cigarette use from ages 23 to 55: Links with health and well-being in the long-term National Child Development Study. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 78.

No benefit of light to moderate drinking for mortality from coronary heart disease when better comparison groups and controls included: A commentary on Zhao et al.

Maggs, J. L., & Staff, J. (2017). No benefit of light to moderate drinking for mortality from coronary heart disease when better comparison groups and controls included: A commentary on Zhao et al. (2017). Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 78.

Academic time during college: Associations with mood, tiredness, and binge drinking across days and semesters

Greene, K. M., & Maggs, J. L. (2017). Academic time during college: Associations with mood, tiredness, and binge drinking across days and semesters. Journal of Adolescence, 56, 24–33.