Xia-Mengya

Mengya Xia

PAMT Pre-doctoral Trainee

404 HHD Building
mxx108@psu.edu

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Biography

Mengya Xia’s interest in prevention research started about three years ago while studying how family-centered programs affect an individual’s wellbeing. Mengya is a Prevention And Methodology Training program trainee who works with Greg Fosco and Mark Feinberg. She has authored four peer-reviewed journal articles that have appeared in publications such as Developmental Psychology and The Journal of Family Psychology.

Since she came to the Prevention Research Center, Mengya has been a part of several projects, including PROSPER, MSFP-14 and Family Foundations. As Mengya’s career continues, she is interested in exploring how triadic family dynamics can influence an individual’s wellbeing, and hopes to research this in the future. She would also like to explore prevention programs that target individual positive development from the family.

Mengya has a master of education degree in basic psychology from Wuhan University and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in human development and family studies. According to Mengya, the best part about working at the Center is the project and research opportunities that she has had. When she is not researching, presenting at conferences, or preparing her manuscripts, Mengya enjoys playing badminton, reading and singing. 

Recent Publications

The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale Short Form (DERSSF)

Kaufman, E. A., Xia, M., Fosco, G. M., Yaptangco, M., Skidmore, C. R., & Crowell, S. E. (2016). The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale Short Form (DERSSF): Validation and replication in adolescent and adult samples. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 38, 443-455.

Trajectories of adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior and family climate: Longitudinal implications for young adult romantic relationship competence

Fosco, G.M., Van Ryzin, M., Xia, M., & Feinberg, M.E. (2016). Trajectories of adolescent hostile-aggressive behavior and family climate: Longitudinal implications for young adult romantic relationship competence. Developmental Psychology, 52(7), 1139-1150.